Spotlight on the Apprentice: Anisha Sharma

Katha Dance Theatre is a dance company and school run by some of the country’s finest kathak artists. Our dancers are passionate about the kathak tradition and have worked hard to reach their level of artistry, practicing daily in order to develop their skills. But apart from regular practice, what does it take to make a dancer? How do dancers achieve their personal and professional goals? For our apprentices, the answers to these questions come as a result of a lifetime in the classroom. These are hand-chosen students who have shown they have the talent, dedication, and aptitude to work toward eventually joining the company ranks.

In our new interview series Spotlight on the Apprentice, we’re checking in with our talented KDT apprentices – learning about their origins, the development of their dance technique, their goals in the classroom, and more – in order to better understand their individual approaches to practicing their art. This month, our spotlight shines on Anisha Sharma!

How long have you been dancing at KDT?

I have been dancing with KDT since 2009. I was introduced to kathak and the company by my dad and have been a part of KDT ever since then.

What led to you becoming a KDT apprentice?

A few years after joining KDT, I attended a summer workshop taught by Rita. That was when my interest in kathak first began to evolve into a passion. My love for kathak was solidified through attending a wide range of workshops, summer intensives, and classes over the years. I was invited to become an apprentice and perform in my first professional show, Rubaiyat – Life in a Day, in the fall of 2014.

What do you like best about KDT as a school/organization?

Katha Dance Theatre is more than just a studio; I consider it a second home and family. The school is set up in a way that a student can join with any dance background. My favorite times at KDT have consisted of end-of-the-year recitals like Sadhana and performing at professional and touring shows. I love having the opportunity to showcase my love of dance and the skills I have gained over time.

Do you have any specific methods for retaining technique and memorizing steps?

I found that repetition is the most effective way for me to learn the technique and choreography. 

What do you love most about dancing? And what is most challenging about it?

At the start of every session, Rita will perform the dance [technical or lyrical, depending on the session] we will be learning. Every time I watch her perform, I am in awe of her grace yet nervous about my personal execution. Without fail, each year I surprise myself with how much I have learned over the course of the session. The most challenging part of kathak is footwork; the intricate patterns are difficult to learn but all the more rewarding to master. Chakars (spins) are very challenging, especially when they are extremely fast. 

What are your goals as a dancer?

Even within the past year, I have learned so much, from improving my own technique to developing my expressions on stage. Going forward, I hope to continue building these skills and learn as much as possible. In the future, I strive to become a company member and perform in more professional shows. Eventually, my goal is to share my passion for kathak with others through teaching and touring!

Which of KDT’s past shows do you most wish you had performed in and why?

Along with learning kathak, I have also been learning Hindustani classical singing from Dr. Pooja Goswami for the last 12 years. For this reason, I would have loved to have been a part of Sufiana because Dr. Goswami was the lead singer in that show. It would have presented such a cool opportunity to bridge both of my passions in one show.

What advice would you give younger students about developing and progressing as a dancer?

The biggest piece of advice I would give is to make sure you are consistently going to classes and that once you are in class to make sure you are fully present. Understanding and applying corrections is the only way you will be able to improve.

Image courtesy of Anisha Sharma.